Juno spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on August 5, 2011 (UTC), as part of the New Frontiers program and entered a polar orbit of Jupiter on July 5, 2016 (UTC). The Mission was intended to begin a scientific investigation of the planet.

Juno is set to complete its 16th trip around Jupiter. Researchers used images collected over multiple fly-bys to simulate a detailed flyover. Images of the largest planet in the Solar System taken from the Juno were released by NASA.

The images released took the interest of both Space enthusiasts and Non-Space enthusiasts alike.

A “dragon’s eye,” “squid,” and “dolphins” are some of the patterns spotted by the Space enthusiasts within Jupiter’s vicinity. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory frequently releases batches of new images as the spacecraft circles the gas giant.

As Described by NASA on its official Website, “Juno’s principal goal is to understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter. Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamental processes and conditions that governed our solar system during its formation. As our primary example of a giant planet, Jupiter can also provide critical knowledge for understanding the planetary systems being discovered around other stars.”

Juno-Cam Images released by NASA:

Juno spacecraft images
Close-up of enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s clouds obtained by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
Juno spacecraft images
This view of Jupiter, taken by the JunoCam imager of NASA’s Juno spacecraft, highlights Oval BA.
Juno spacecraft images
A swirling storm just south of one of the white oval storms on Jupiter.
Juno spacecraft images
Jupiter’s atmosphere when JunoCam snapped this image on Feb. 2 at 5:13 a.m. PT (8:13 a.m. ET), from an altitude of about 9,000 miles above the giant planet’s swirling cloudtops.
Juno spacecraft images
Citizen scientist Eric Jorgensen created this Jovian artwork with a JunoCam image.
Juno spacecraft images
This image of a crescent Jupiter and the iconic Great Red Spot was created by a citizen scientist (Roman Tkachenko) using data from Juno’s JunoCam instrument.
Juno spacecraft images
This infrared image gives an unprecedented view of the southern aurora of Jupiter, as captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on August 27, 2016.
Juno spacecraft images
The “Face”. The original image was acquired by JunoCam on NASA’s Juno spacecraft
Juno spacecraft images
A close view of the bright clouds that dot Jupiter’s south tropical zone, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
Juno spacecraft images
Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles.
Juno spacecraft images
This enhanced color Jupiter image, taken by the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft, showcases several interesting features on the apparent edge (limb) of the planet.
Juno spacecraft images
This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter.

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